Different types of dating violence

Learn About Dating Abuse | Break the Cycle

different types of dating violence

Dating violence is violence that occurs within a dating relationship rather than, say, marriage; and dating violence is as much a problem for. Dating abuse or dating violence is defined as the perpetration or threat of an act of violence by This abuse/violence can take a number of forms: sexual assault, sexual harassment, threats, physical violence, verbal, mental, or emotional. Dating abuse (also known as dating violence, intimate partner violence, Every relationship is different, but the things that unhealthy and abusive Teens and young adults experience the same types of abuse as adults, including: Physical.

Go to an Emergency Room or Health Clinic. It is very important for you to seek health care as soon as you can after being assaulted. Remember there is always help.

Financial Abuse Financial abuse can be very subtle. It can include telling you what you can and cannot buy or requiring you to share control of your bank accounts.

At no point does someone you are dating have the right to use money or how you spend it to control you. Here are some examples of financially abusive behaviors: Giving you an allowance and closely watching what you buy.

Placing your paycheck in their account and denying you access to it. Keeping you from seeing shared bank accounts or records. Forbidding you to work or limiting the hours you do. Preventing you from going to work by taking your car or keys. Getting you fired by harassing you, your employer or coworkers on the job.

Types of Abuse

Hiding or stealing your student financial aid check or outside financial support. Maxing out your credit cards without your permission. Refusing to give you money, food, rent, medicine or clothing.

different types of dating violence

Spending money on themselves but not allowing you to do the same. Using their money to hold power over you because they know you are not in the same financial situation as they are. If you are not in control over your finances, or if your partner has removed money from your bank account, it can seem very scary to leave an abusive relationship. Digital Abuse Digital dating abuse is the use of technologies such as texting and social networking to bully, harass, stalk or intimidate a partner.

Often this behavior is a form of verbal or emotional abuse perpetrated online.

different types of dating violence

It is never okay for someone to do or say anything that makes you feel bad, lowers your self-esteem or manipulates you. You may be experiencing digital abuse if your partner: Sends you negative, insulting or even threatening emails, Facebook messages, tweets, DMs or other messages online.

different types of dating violence

Uses sites like Facebook, Twitter, foursquare and others to keep constant tabs on you. Puts you down in their status updates.

different types of dating violence

Pressures you to send explicit video or sexts. Steals or insists on being given your passwords. Looks through your phone frequently, checks up on your pictures, texts and outgoing calls. Tags you unkindly in pictures on Instagram, Tumblr, etc. It is okay to turn off your phone. You have the right to be alone and spend time with friends and family without your partner getting angry.

You do not have to share your passwords with anyone. Know your privacy settings. Social networks such as Facebook allow the user to control how their information is shared and who has access to it.

Dating violence - Wikipedia

These are often customizable and are found in the privacy section of the site. Remember, registering for some applications apps requires you to change your privacy settings. Be mindful when using check-ins like Facebook Places and foursquare. Letting an abusive partner know where you are could be dangerous. You never know if they are trying to keep their location secret. Stalking You are being stalked when a person repeatedly watches, follows or harasses you, making you feel afraid or unsafe.

Teen Dating Violence

A stalker can be someone you know, a past partner or a stranger. While the actual legal definition varies from one state to another, here are some examples of what stalkers may do: Show up at your home or place of work unannounced or uninvited.

different types of dating violence

Send you unwanted text messages, letters, emails and voicemails. Leave unwanted items, gifts or flowers. Constantly call you and hang up. Use social networking sites and technology to track you. Spread rumors about you via the internet or word of mouth. Make unwanted phone calls to you. Call your employer or professor. Wait at places you hang out. Use other people as resources to investigate your life.

Teen Dating Violence|Intimate Partner Violence|Violence Preventtion|Injury Center|CDC

Damage your home, car or other property. You may also have trouble sleeping or concentrating at work or school. Dating abuse also known as dating violence, intimate partner violence, or relationship abuse is a pattern of abusive behaviors -- usually a series of abusive behaviors over a course of time -- used to exert power and control over a dating partner.

Teen Dating Violence

Every relationship is different, but the things that unhealthy and abusive relationships have in common are issues of power and control. Violent words and actions are tools an abusive partner uses to gain and maintain power and control over their partner. Any young person can experience dating abuse or unhealthy relationship behaviors, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic standing, ethnicity, religion or culture. There are some warning signs that can help you identify if your relationship is unhealthy or abusive, including the examples below.

Remember, the abuse is never your fault, and asking for help is nothing to be ashamed of. Teens and young adults experience the same types of abuse as adults, including: Any intentional use of physical force with the intent to cause fear or injury, like hitting, shoving, biting, strangling, kicking or using a weapon. Verbal or Emotional Abuse: Non-physical behaviors such as threats, insults, constant monitoring, humiliation, intimidation, isolation or stalking.

Being repeatedly watched, followed, monitored or harassed. Stalking can occur online or in person, and may or may not include giving unwanted gifts. Exerting power and control over a partner through their finances, including taking or withholding money from a partner, or prohibiting a partner from earning, or spending their money. Here are a few examples: